Become
10 Things You Need To Know About Being On A Board
Words by KATIE BISHOP
Photography by JEAN-PHILIPPE DELBERGHE
Become
10 Things You Need To Know About Being On A Board
Words by KATIE BISHOP
Photography by JEAN-PHILIPPE DELBERGHE
What does the role of being on a board involve? One director shares her words of wisdom.

The importance of diversity on boards cannot be underestimated. Research shows that having female directors on boards improves the quality of deliberations and that different perspectives allow for a broader range of information to be considered. Yet only around 19% of Russell 3000 board seats are held by women, in spite of experts proving that companies with at least three women on their board tend to perform better financially.

That's why AllBright has launched AllBright Elevator, our new development programmes aimed at helping senior leaders achieve their potential and take the next step in their careers.

"You can’t underestimate the importance of professional development and a network to learn with and from. It can be lonely at the top, but it doesn’t need to be"
Anna Jones, AllBright co-founder

The Elevator programmes, one for those in or moving into C-suite roles and one for those looking at board level positions, are done in small cohorts, meaning participants will gain unprecedented opportunities to connect with like-minded women over the course of a year. The programmes mix one on one coaching with technical masterclasses, workshops and curated resources.

As AllBright co-founder Anna Jones says: "You can’t underestimate the importance of professional development and a network to learn with and from. It can be lonely at the top, but it doesn’t need to be."

Are you an aspiring board member wondering where to start your search? You should consider looking close to home. Studies on technology boards showed that around 80% of board members landed their seat through their existing contacts, so networking could be key in landing your first role.A new drive for diversity means that companies are increasingly willing to consider first-time directors onto their board, particularly those in specialty roles who can fill critical skill gaps in the boardroom – in fact, almost half of female directors currently have a background in non-business sectors. Financial experts are in high demand for board roles, as are tech savvy digital directors and individuals who have worked internationally, meaning that being able to demonstrate a specific skillset can be just as important as previous leadership experience.

Being part of a board can feel like a big step in your career, but this shouldn’t put you off striving towards an exciting new position. The more that women participate on boards, the more that we build diverse and equitable businesses – and we can all be part of the change.

Donna Wells is a financial technology entrepreneur who serves on the Advisory Board of CrowdStreet. She was President and CEO of Mindflash Technologies and has served on multiple boards over her career. Here, she shares her pearls of wisdom about being on a board.

Utilize your existing connections when seeking a board role

I was introduced to my first board through a recruiter who had been given a very specific set of criteria for a new board member, but I was ultimately invited to join because I had shared connections with the board Chairman and CEO. It was their reference calls with our mutual friends that gave them the confidence to take a chance on me as a first-time director.

Find a board where you are able to both contribute and learn

I would encourage anyone considering board service to approach potential roles with the same twin objectives I had when joining my first board at Boston Private Bank – being able to both contribute and learn. I was looking for a board where I could contribute relevant and diverse experience to the critical boardroom discussion, and I could learn a great deal from public board service that would help me to develop as a CEO and board member in my own company.

"During the board interview process, identify and share the 2-3 strategic issues that would be your personal focus for the first 12-24 months on the board"
Donna Wells, financial technology entrepreneur and member of the Advisory Board Of CrowdStreet

Apply an 80/20 rule

Look for a board where you can contribute 80% to the board conversations, but where 20% of the conversations are going to be new – and on issues that are relevant and interesting to you personally and professionally. On your first board, that 80% will likely be in your industry, organizational and leadership experience. The 20% might be in topics around corporate governance, legal and regulatory issues.

Identify and share your personal focuses

During the interview process, identify and share the 2-3 strategic issues that would be your personal focus for the first 12-24 months on the board. This will help you and the nominating committee determine if you have shared expectations and a solid mutual fit, and will increase your value, effectiveness and impact as a board member.

Consider carefully which board committees you’d be sitting on

Board committees are where most of the work, and most of your personal impact, will happen. I’m a big advocate of new board members joining the audit committee, as I believe that this is the best and fastest way to come up to speed on the company, its leadership and key strategic issues.

"After developing the requisite skills for board service, networking with other board members is probably the second most important element of a successful board career"
Donna Wells, financial technology entrepreneur and member of the Advisory Board Of CrowdStreet

Be prepared

I believe that the secret to feeling comfortable in your first board role and meeting is good preparation. Arrange calls with the CFO, General Counsel, and CEO as well as other key staff and line managers. If the company does not have an established director onboarding program (many don’t), I’d suggest you identify and recommend one of the many templates available from board governance organizations such as the NACD in the US.

Build your network

After developing the requisite skills for board service, networking with other board members is probably the second most important element of a successful board career. These contacts will probably be the source of your first board role and the best people to tap for advice. Board work is a challenging and unique job, and there are not many people with experience of a board position – I’ve found it incredibly valuable to have a couple of trusted, experienced board members to go to for advice when facing challenging issues.

Ask for one-on-one conversations with other board members

Ask for one-on-one conversations with other board members, and spend the majority of your time getting to know your new colleagues personally, versus asking about company specifics. A corporate board is a unique decision-making entity, and your understanding of other members’ interests, communication preferences, and personal approaches to problem solving will be a key factor in your effectiveness on the board.

"One of the ways that I’ve handled the male-dominated environment of a board is to ask for a male mentor with whom I can establish a trusting and candid dialogue"
Donna Wells, financial technology entrepreneur and member of the Advisory Board Of CrowdStreet

Establish two-way mentoring relationships

One of the ways that I’ve handled the male-dominated environment of a board is to ask for a male mentor with whom I can establish a trusting and candid dialogue. Over time, work to create a two-way mentoring relationship. Adding a new Director is a significant investment by any company, so you should appreciate that you have been brought on board to contribute your unique perspective and experiences. Learning how and when to disagree respectfully with a tenured member of the board and influence the boardroom conversation globally are necessary skills in delivering your value to the board and company.

Identify opportunities for growth

Throughout my time as a CEO I’ve remained deeply interested and engaged in a number of organizational, economic and societal issues such as the impact of technology on society, income, wealth inequality and diversity and inclusion. My board work keeps me current and engaged on these issues and I highly value the opportunity for professional and personal growth and impact.

Are you looking for more information about taking the next step up in your career and joining a board? Head here for more information about AllBright Elevator.

Join The Digital Sisterhood

We have launched the Digital Sisterhood to provide women everywhere with the community and support they need at the moment. Be that a safe space to ask questions – and receive honest answers – or somewhere to find a digital event that will offer you the information, or perhaps the encouragement, you need to get you through the coming days and weeks. We’re here for you, so please do head to digital.allbrightcollective.com to claim your 14 day free trial and join our community.

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